Nevada – MPP Last update: July 17, 2017

On November 8, 2016, 55% of Nevada voters approved Question 2, which legalizes, taxes, and regulates marijuana for adults 21 and older. The Marijuana Policy Project played a leading role in the campaign, which faced well-financed opposition, including $3.5 million from casino magnate Sheldon Adelson. Many thanks to everyone who volunteered, donated, talked to friends and family, and voted! We couldn’t have done it without you.

Las Vegas Marijuana Trimming Service

Adults 21 and older with a valid ID canpurchase up to one ounce of marijuana or one-eighth of an ounce of marijuana-infused edibles or concentrates from licensed marijuana retail outlets. Retail marijuana sales aresubject to a 10 percent sales tax, which state officials estimate will generate more than $60 million in the first two years.

Supply has been short due to the great demand from patrons of dispensaries, which has led to some empty shelves. In an effort to bolster stock, Gov. Sandoval approved emergency measures to increase the movement of marijuana to the state’s 47 licensed retail outlets, some of which have had lines out the door since legal pot was made available on July 1.

Additionally, the state’s Tax Commission discussed expediting the issuance of more licenses, and regulators announced they would issue the first two marijuana distribution licenses.

Marijuana Trimmers in Las Vegas

Question 2 required the state to initiate adult sales byJanuary 1, 2018, but theNevadaTax Commission adopted temporary regulations allowing sales to begin six months earlier through existing licensed medical marijuana outlets. Marijuana possession has been legal for adults 21 and older since Question 2 took effect on January 1, 2017.

Medical marijuana program continues to grow

The state’s medical marijuana program continues its rapid growth. As of October 2016, about 23,375patients were registered in the program — a figure that has well more than doubled since mid-2015. State officials attribute the growth to the availability of regulated dispensaries, many of which started operations in 2015 and earlier this year.

How domedical marijuana patients visiting Nevada get access while in the state?

One of the positive features of Nevada’s medical marijuana law is that the state recognizes the patient status of non-residents who are qualified under their state government’s laws. Current rules require out-of-state visiting patients to visit a Nevada dispensary to sign an affidavit and receive instructions from dispensary staff in order to be protected. At that point, state law will protect qualified visitors who make purchases at state-licensed stores.

For updates on the status of the department’s roll out including news and valuable links, visit the Department of Health and Human Services Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health’s website. Agency rules adopted in April can be found here.

Stay connected

Thank you for supporting MPP. To stay updated on the status of marijuana policy reform in Nevada, be sure to subscribe to MPP’s free legislative alert service.

Nevada lawmaker wants medical marijuana for pets

A Nevada lawmaker proposed a bill in the state legislature on Tuesday that would grant ailing pets access to medical marijuana.

The measure, put forward by Democrat Tick Segerblom, would let owners obtain the drug for their animals if a veterinarian confirmed it ” may mitigate the symptoms or effects” of a chronic or debilitating medical condition.

Marijuana Trimmers in Las Vegas

The proposed bill also includes provisions related to medical marijuana use among humans, including new regulations for dispensaries and dropping penalties for motorists found driving with the drug in their system.

The proposal comes as a growing number of U.S. states have relaxed marijuana laws. Nevada is one of 23 states where medical marijuana is legal, and voters have approved the drug for recreational use in four states and Washington, D.C.

Public opinion has also shifted dramatically toward legalizing marijuana in recent years. Some 46 percent of Americans support full legalization of marijuana, according to Reuters/Ipsos polling.

MARIJUANA: STATES GET THE RIGHT.

SALEM – Nearly 40,000 Oregonians who smoke or supply medical

marijuana can breathe a little easier after receiving assurances from

the Obama administration Monday that they will not face prosecution if

they follow state laws that give them the right to use, grow or deliver

a drug that is illegal under federal law.

The U.S. Justice Department delivered its new guidelines to U.S.

attorneys in Oregon and 13 other states with medical marijuana laws. The

department’s three-page memo instructs government lawyers to limit

their focus to drug traffickers, including those who illega

Nevada – MPP

Cannabis in Las Vegas

On November 8, 2016, 55% of Nevada voters approved Question 2, which legalizes, taxes, and regulates marijuana for adults 21 and older. The Marijuana Policy Project played a leading role in the campaign, which faced well-financed opposition, including $3.5 million from casino magnate Sheldon Adelson. Many thanks to everyone who volunteered, donated, talked to friends and family, and voted! We couldn’t have done it without you.

Adults 21 and older with a valid ID canpurchase up to one ounce of marijuana or one-eighth of an ounce of marijuana-infused edibles or concentrates from licensed marijuana retail outlets. Retail marijuana sales aresubject to a 10 percent sales tax, which state officials estimate will generate more than $60 million in the first two years.

Supply has been short due to the great demand from patrons of dispensaries, which has led to some empty shelves. In an effort to bolster stock, Gov. Sandoval approved emergency measures to increase the movement of marijuana to the state’s 47 licensed retail outlets, some of which have had lines out the door since legal pot was made available on July 1.

Additionally, the state’s Tax Commission discussed expediting the issuance of more licenses, and regulators announced they would issue the first two marijuana distribution licenses.

Question 2 required the state to initiate adult sales byJanuary 1, 2018, but theNevadaTax Commission adopted temporary regulations allowing sales to begin six months earlier through existing licensed medical marijuana outlets. Marijuana possession has been legal for adults 21 and older since Question 2 took effect on January 1, 2017.

Medical marijuana program continues to grow

The state’s medical marijuana program continues its rapid growth. As of October 2016, about 23,375patients were registered in the program — a figure that has well more than doubled since mid-2015. State officials attribute the growth to the availability of regulated dispensaries, many of which started operations in 2015 and earlier this year.

How domedical marijuana patients visiting Nevada get access while in the state?

One of the positive features of Nevada’s medical marijuana law is that the state recognizes the patient status of non-residents who are qualified under their state government’s laws. Current rules require out-of-state visiting patients to visit a Nevada dispensary to sign an affidavit and receive instructions from dispensary staff in order to be protected. At that point, state law will protect qualified visitors who make purchases at state-licensed stores.

For updates on the status of the department’s roll out including news and valuable links, visit the Department of Health and Human Services Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health’s website. Agency rules adopted in April can be found here.

Stay connected

Thank you for supporting MPP. To stay updated on the status of marijuana policy reform in Nevada, be sure to subscribe to MPP’s free legislative alert service.

Legalize it: A Utilitarian Perspective on the Legalization of Marijuana

The United States government claims marijuana use is harmful and addictive, thus has placed it on the Controlled Substances list as a schedule 1 class drug. This makes the possession and use of marijuana illegal, while the more harmful drugs of nicotine in the form of cigarettes and alcohol are legal for personal use. As a personal choice and a medicinal use, marijuana use should be legalized. This will be a utilitarian’s perspective on legalizing marijuana.

First, let’s start off with some information about marijuana, this way we are all familiar with it, and not just with information one may have picked up from television or misinformed people and misinformation. Marijuana, with the common name of Cannabis, comes from the plant kingdom of the family Cannabaceae. “The standard name of marijuana is Cannabis Sativa L” (FDA, 2012). According to the Drug Enforcement Administration’s website, “Cannabis contains chemicals called cannaboids that are unique to the Cannabis plant. Among the cannabinoids synthesized by the plant are cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinolidic acids, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, and several isomers of tetrahydrocannbinol” (DEA, 2012). Besides these Cannaboids the other main cannabinoid of Marijuana that causes its effects would be delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol, the one everyone talks about, the great THC. “THC is believed to be responsible for most of the characteristic psychoactive effects of cannabis” (DEA, 2012). These substances carry many medicinal values and legalizing marijuana for medicinal and/or personal use would be beneficial for many people. For now in most states and federally, marijuana is illegal. (good research)

What makes marijuana a drug and illegal? The effects of ingesting or inhalation of the plant, which consist of a feeling of euphoria (feeling really good), oh no we wouldn’t want that now would we, relaxation, increase in appetite (munchies), this is at a low dose. Higher doses “can cause intensified feelings of the lower dose feelings, some hallucinogenic effects, short term memory loss, short attention span, and image distortion”(Spinella, M., 2001). I can understand why it would be illegal to drive after taking any form of marijuana, but, to make it illegal?

Since 1970, the United States government has listed marijuana as a schedule 1 narcotic on the controlled substances act list of controlled substances. From the Drug Enforcement Agency’s website, “Schedule I Controlled Substances:

Substances in this schedule have a high potential for abuse, have no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and there is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision. Some examples of substances listed in schedule I am: heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), marijuana (cannabis), peyote, methaqualone, and 3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (“ecstasy”)” (DEA, 2012). Schedule 1 drugs are considered the “worst” drugs, these are worst and have no medical use compared to cocaine and oxycodone, which are schedule 2 class controlled substances. Marijuana to the government is considered worse than cocaine? We will cover this aspect in a little while, for now to be on the controlled substance list as a schedule 1 narcotic a substance must meet the following criteria:

A) The drug or other substance has high potential for abuse.

B) The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States

C) There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision (DEA, 2012)

Most of these criteria throughout this paper will be proven wrong, so then why is marijuana illegal? (good examples and questions) Cannabis

The Relativist’s view on marijuana would be the one closest to what used to be mainstream society. Since relativism is ” the idea that one’s beliefs and values are understood in terms of one’s society, culture, or even one’s own individual values”(Mosser, K., 2010), this could be used as societies view of marijuana starting from the early 1930’s. Staring with propaganda films against marijuana like “Tell Your Children”, aka “Reefer Madness” (imdb.com, 2012). Films like this exaggerated the effects of marijuana. Misinformation was and still is a big contributor to why marijuana is still illegal, instead of becoming educated upon the subject people tend to stand by old mythical tales of marijuana. Examples of some myths, it will cause one to go crazy, causes lack of motivation, and it causes uncontrollable anger, all misconceptions and myths. There is plenty more which will be covered shortly. Even politicians are uneducated and misinformed before they pass laws or veto bills on marijuana, how is this fair to the voters and the people who could use marijuana for medicinal purposes? It is not.

As for the relativist, society has made marijuana illegal so, it should be illegal. This is changing, more and more states are legalizing marijuana for medicinal use, so society and the relativist view is slowly starting to change. Marijuana may be illegal by the federal government but, there are 17 states and Washington D.C. that have legalized marijuana use for medicinal purposes. Those states are: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington. This disproves the second criteria for a substance to meet to be a Schedule 1 narcotic.

A utilitarianism perspective on marijuana, which would be closest to my own, would be for the greater good. “Utilitarianism argues that, given a set of choices, the act we should choose is that which produces the best results for the greatest number affected by that choice”(Mosser, K., 2010). That choice should be for the medicinal value of marijuana, to help the people in pain to not be in pain. This also would in my view be a part of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, since people in pain are pursuing happiness by not being in pain. To help back the utilitarianism view as marijuana’s use as medicine, from the Marijuana Medical Handbook: Practical Guide to Therapeutic uses of Marijuana, “Marijuana has been used as a medicine since at least the 3rd millennium B.C., in China, it appears in the Pen T`sao as a remedy for gout, rheumatism, malaria, beriberi, constipation, and absent mindedness. Tradition ascribes the Pen T`sao to the legendary Emperor Shen-Nung” (Gieringer & Et AL., 2008). Many other cultures have used marijuana as an herbal remedy, as has the United States until it was first made illegal in 1937. (Good discussion / research)_

There are many, many medicinal uses for marijuana and this has been proven by many studies. Some of the medicinal uses of marijuana are:

A) Anti nauseant and appetite stimulant- this helps with nausea due to anorexia, chemotherapy, AIDS/HIV, and weight loss due to hepatitis C, to name a few.

B) Anti convulsant – helps with convulsions caused by: tetanus, hydrophobia(rabies), chorea, and strychnine poisoning

C) Anti spasmodic- “The THC in marijuana is effective in reducing spasms and relieving pain from spinal cord injuries” (Gieringer & Et Al., 2008). Also effective in reducing the effects of multiple sclerosis, spinal injuries, epilepsy, and many other conditions

D) Gastrointestinal disorders- helps relieve menstrual disorders, labor pain, tourette’s syndrome, and other movement disorders

E) Analgesic- marijuana can be used as a pain reliever; it is especially useful for chronic pain and migraines. “Using marijuana in place of acetaminophen which carries a substantial risk of fatal liver damage in excess dosage” (Geiringer & Et Al., 2008). Acetaminophen an over the counter drug that is used like candy and given to children.

F) Anti inflammatory and immune system modulator

G) Miscellaneous applications/ glaucoma, asthma, and many, many others

H) Lastly, Neuropathic effects, “Recent scientific studies have shown that the cannabinoids in marijuana are actually neuro protective, and can be used to prevent and treat toxic damage and inflammation of the nerves” (Geiringer & Et Al., 2008).

So far the good seems to far outweigh the bad. Legalizing marijuana

As with anything one may ingest or inhale into their body there are some adverse effects. These effects are few compared to the good that marijuana can do, but, the adverse effects do have to be taken into consideration. The relativist could use these as their support as to why marijuana should be kept illegal as society has kept it for so long. The adverse effects are: “Short-term marijuana by inhalation increases bronchodilation. However, long term it impairs lung function and leads to constrictive lung disease” (Mosey’s, 2010). Also, cardiovascular issues could occur, rapid heartbeat and increase in blood pressure. These tend to last only for a short time, but, can be harmful to someone with a pre-existing condition. Possible allergic reaction could cause some health concerns. As for dying from a marijuana overdose, there is no record of any person dying from marijuana. According to the book, Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence, “it would require 125mg of THC per kilogram of body weight to receive a fatal dose. Most marijuana cigarettes contain 20mg of THC. So, a 160 pound person would require all of the THC in over 450 joints to reach a lethal dose” (Earlywine, M, 2002). Crazy right, one would die of smoke inhalation before they died from the “drugs” in the plant itself. Yet it is still illegal. Still tobacco and alcohol are legal and they are proven to cause hundreds of thousands of deaths a year. (Well-developed key elements)

As for any long-term effects the plant has on the brain, “careful research on humans has shown no structural changes associated with chronic cannabis exposure in adulthood” (Earlywine, M., 2002). No damage to the brain besides short term memory loss while smoking, hmmm. Pulmonary research has shown no significant increase in respiratory illnesses, also “no data reveals any definitive increases in rates of lung cancer” (Earlywine, M., 2002). Some Lung airway problems have occurred, increase in irritation of the bronchial tubes and searing of the cilia (the little hairs in the lungs). As with inhaling smoke from anything, damage will be done to the lungs and airways. There is one way to combat the adverse effects of the smoke and that is to eat the plant instead of smoking it. Marijuana itself has not been proven to cause any form of cancer. However the smoke from marijuana has been proven to have carcinogens in it.

Now to go back to the criteria of making the list of a schedule 1 narcotic:

A) The drug or other substance has high potential for abuse /Marijuana can be abused, just like anything and everything. Soda can be abused and can be just as harmful as marijuana.

B) The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical use in treatment / As has been proved earlier in this paper there are plenty of medicinal reasons and is currently starting to be accepted

C) There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or other substance under medical supervision / The 17 states and D.C. that were mentioned earlier all have medical supervision safety rules put into place and they seem to be working fine.

So, the criteria for the Schedule 1 controlled substance act, is of no use, marijuana clearly does not meet the criteria, yet it is still illegal. The greater good of the majority of people would benefit from the legalization of this plant, the voters have proven this, and the politicians keep vetoing the bills.

Now on to the ethical questions one should ask:

Is it ethical to deny a dying person in pain marijuana for their comfort? At this point I am sure the person whom is dying will have no concern for the law and would use marijuana if they so chose, but, for purpose of proving a point I figured this was a good question.

Is it ethical to deny someone who has chronic pain a natural pain reliever with less harmful side effects? Most prescribed pain relievers contain acetaminophen, which can cause liver damage and failure. Then there are the other narcotics that are more susceptible to abuse and addiction.

Is it ethical to deny a person whom is undergoing chemotherapy for cancer a chance to relive some pain and calm the persistent nausea caused by the radiation? A natural alternative to help aid in the fight against cancer, to deny a person this is unethical.

Is it ethical to deny a person their right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness? Marijuana, a plant, is the path for many to their pursuit of happiness away from pain, how can they be denied? (good discussion)

One of the biggest effects of marijuana being illegal would be the people who get sent to jail for possessing it. This tears families apart, people lose jobs and sometimes children get taken away. All from a plant that grows wildly across the world, how is this fair? The money gained from legalizing and taxing marijuana would be substantial, let alone the money saved from imprisoning people for possessing a plant. The tide is changing; the future of marijuana legalization for medicinal use and small amounts for personal use is on the way.

The perspective of utilitarianism on the legalization of marijuana for personal use and medicinal use is based mostly on the greater good for the people who suffer from a painful ailment. I would be one of these people; unfortunately, I live in a state where it is illegal personally and medicinally. If it was legal for medicinal use I would qualify for a few different reasons, mainly I suffer from chronic pain. Instead of being able to use marijuana where I would be able to function better, (I know from my own past experiences), my doctors have put me on several different pain medications. Most contain acetaminophen, which in the long run will probably cause me more damage, others I have to deal with side effects that are not that pleasant. Until marijuana is legal I will have to deal with these, until then I smile and hope. There are more and more organizations and groups popping up daily that support marijuana use, these groups are also dong one of the most important things in getting marijuana legalized, spreading knowledge.
legalizing marijuana
References:

Earlywine, M. (2002). Understanding Marijuana: A New Look at the Scientific Evidence. . Cary, N.C.: Oxford University Press Retrieved from: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ashford/docDetail.action?docID=10084807&p00=marijuana

Gieringer, Dale Rosenthal, Ed Carter, Gregory T. (2008). Marijuana Medical Handbook: Practical Guide to Therapeutic Uses of Marijuana. Berkley, CA, USA: Quick Trading Company. Retrieved from: http://site.ebrary.com/lib/ashford/docDetail.action?docID=10330839&p00=marijuana

Hillman, G., (2012). Tell Your Children/ Reefer Madness.1938, Internet Movie Database, George A. Hillman Productions. Retrieved from: http://www.//imdb.com/title/tt0028346/

Marijuana. (2010). In Mosby’s Handbook of Herbs & Natural Supplements. Retrieved from http://www.credoreference.com/entry/ehsmosbyherbs/marijuana

Mosser, K., (2010) Introduction to Ethics and Social Responsibility. San Diego, Bridgepoint Education, Inc. Retrieved from: https://content.ashford.edu

ProCon.org. (2012, June 1). 17 Legal Medical Marijuana States and DC. MedicalMarijuana.ProCon.org. Retrieved from http://medicalmarijuana.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000881

United States Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) (2012). Controlled Substances Act of 1970. Retrieved from: http://www.justice.gov

Cannabis in Las Vegas

United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), (2012).Poisonous Plant Database. Retrieved from: http://google2.fda.gov/search?q=marijuana&client=FDAgov&site=FDAgov&lr=&proxystylesheet=FDAgov&output=xml_no_dtd&getfields=* legalizing marijuana

Nevada marijuana supply running low, state of emergency declared, governor says

Nevada marijuana supply running low, state of emergency declared, governor says

Nevada state officials declared a state of emergency after stores that sell recreational marijuana reported that their supply is running out just less than two weeks after the drug went on sale legally.

Gov. Brian Sandoval, R-Nev., issued the state of emergency on Friday, which will allow state officials to decide on new rules that could ease the shortage of marijuana, according to Fox 13 Now.

Nevada’s Department of Taxation released a statement that said it will contemplate emergency regulations that would permit liquor wholesalers to cash in on the marijuana sales.

“Based on reports of adult-use marijuana sales already far exceeding the industry’s expectations at the state’s 47 licensed retail marijuana stores and the reality that many stores are running out of inventory, the Department must address the lack of distributors immediately,” the Department of Taxation said in a statement. “Some establishments report the need for delivery within the next several days.”

RETRIAL BEGINS FOR FOUR BUNDY SUPPORTERS FROM 2014 ARMED STANDOFF

In November, after the law legalizing marijuana in Nevada was passed, liquor distributors were promised that they would have the sole rights of moving the drug for 18 months, but the department said many distributors did not meet the requirements needed in order to be licensed.

The legal selling of recreational marijuana in Nevada went into effect on Saturday, July 1, 2017.

(AP)

“We continue to work with the liquor wholesalers who have applied for distribution licenses, but most don’t yet meet the requirements that would allow us to license them. Even as we attempted to schedule the final facility inspection for one of the applicants this week, they told us their facility was not ready and declined the inspection. As of mid-day Friday, not one distribution license has been issued,” Stephanie Klapstein, a spokesperson for the Department of Taxation, told USA Today.

The dispensaries that were originally allowed to retail medical marijuana can now sell recreational marijuana as well and, by law, must be given the drug from a licensed distributor. But many of the facilities have been left with a diminishing supply.

TOURISTS, LOCALS BUY NEVADA’S LEGAL RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA

“The business owners in this industry have invested hundreds of millions of dollars to build facilities across the state,” the Department of Taxation’s statement continued. “They have hired and trained thousands of additional employees to meet the demands of the market. Unless the issue with distributor licensing is resolved quickly, the inability to deliver product to retail stores will result in many of these people losing their jobs and will bring this nascent market to a grinding halt.”

Nevada voters approved to legalize recreational pot in November. The state joined Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Alaska in allowing adults to buy the drug that is banned by the federal government.

Marijuana Trimming in Las Vegas

To buy, those 21 and older with a valid ID and purchase up to an ounce of pot at dispensaries. The drug can only be consumed in a private home, not in public, including the Strip, hotels and casinos. Violators face a misdemeanor citation and $600 fine.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Nevada – MPP Last update: July 17, 2017

Nevada – MPP Last update: July 17, 2017

On November 8, 2016, 55% of Nevada voters approved Question 2, which legalizes, taxes, and regulates marijuana for adults 21 and older. The Marijuana Policy Project played a leading role in the campaign, which faced well-financed opposition, including $3.5 million from casino magnate Sheldon Adelson. Many thanks to everyone who volunteered, donated, talked to friends and family, and voted! We couldn’t have done it without you.

Adults 21 and older with a valid ID canpurchase up to one ounce of marijuana or one-eighth of an ounce of marijuana-infused edibles or concentrates from licensed marijuana retail outlets. Retail marijuana sales aresubject to a 10 percent sales tax, which state officials estimate will generate more than $60 million in the first two years.

Supply has been short due to the great demand from patrons of dispensaries, which has led to some empty shelves. In an effort to bolster stock, Gov. Sandoval approved emergency measures to increase the movement of marijuana to the state’s 47 licensed retail outlets, some of which have had lines out the door since legal pot was made available on July 1.

Additionally, the state’s Tax Commission discussed expediting the issuance of more licenses, and regulators announced they would issue the first two marijuana distribution licenses.

Question 2 required the state to initiate adult sales byJanuary 1, 2018, but theNevadaTax Commission adopted temporary regulations allowing sales to begin six months earlier through existing licensed medical marijuana outlets. Marijuana possession has been legal for adults 21 and older since Question 2 took effect on January 1, 2017.

Medical marijuana program continues to grow

The state’s medical marijuana program continues its rapid growth. As of October 2016, about 23,375patients were registered in the program — a figure that has well more than doubled since mid-2015. State officials attribute the growth to the availability of regulated dispensaries, many of which started operations in 2015 and earlier this year.

How domedical marijuana patients visiting Nevada get access while in the state?

One of the positive features of Nevada’s medical marijuana law is that the state recognizes the patient status of non-residents who are qualified under their state government’s laws. Current rules require out-of-state visiting patients to visit a Nevada dispensary to sign an affidavit and receive instructions from dispensary staff in order to be protected. At that point, state law will protect qualified visitors who make purchases at state-licensed stores.

For updates on the status of the department’s roll out including news and valuable links, visit the Department of Health and Human Services Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health’s website. Agency rules adopted in April can be found here.

Stay connected

Thank you for supporting MPP. To stay updated on the status of marijuana policy reform in Nevada, be sure to subscribe to MPP’s free legislative alert service.

Medical Marijuana Trimming Service

Why Legalize Marijuana? | HubPages

Source:  site-915152-563-72.strikingly.com/blog/why-legalize-marijuana-hubpages

Marijuana is not physically dangerous. More people have died from prescriptions drugs, firearms, alcohol, aspirin, or peanut butter than from marijuana. No one dies directly from smoking marijuana. I think the problem with the debate over marijuana is that propaganda and beliefs play too much of a role as opposed to facts and common sense. My personal irony of this is that I believed the myths and was adamantly opposed to marijuana until halfway through college.

When I was a sophomore in college I had my first major religious experience and converted to Christianity. This actually became the catalyst that changed my mind. Jesus talked about always being truthful, so I set about reading up on subjects, and as I read up on the arguments it became clear to me that the arguments for keeping marijuana illegal weren’t logical or based on facts.

The more I studied, the more clear this became. Aside from that, common experience told me that stoners were generally just hanging out, doing their thing, watching “Alice in Wonderland” over and over and “stimulating our economy” by spending paychecks on food. The drinkers, some of whom would later be lauded as conservative moral leaders, shattered bottles on my door, picked fights in the hall, vomited in the bathroom sinks, and had huge loud fights for everyone to hear.

The stoners were much better company, and their get togethers never ended in fights. They also had a higher combined GPA than the drinking frats.

Since at that point in my life I wanted truth, logic, and fact to dictate the way I thought, I switched from being against legalized marijuana to being very strongly for it. The arguments for legalization are too strong to ignore.

Common “Facts” Against Marijuana Debunked:

“It’s a gateway drug.” There is no chemical dependency from marijuana. First of all, if there is an end all be all gateway drug, it’s alcohol. Second, you are more chemically addicted to Pepsi, Marlboro, or Budweiser than pot. Some people are going to try anything no matter what, and some people have addictive personalities, but Mary Jane is not a gateway drug the way it is portrayed.

“If we legalize it everyone will run out and become an addict.” 25 million people already admit to smoking pot regularly. 15 million more admit to occasionally partaking. Yet students still graduate college, work still gets done, and the economy hasn’t collapsed ((well it is, but due to rich scumbugs running corporations who would rather have everyone scream about a drug they don’t use as opposed to watch our 401-k while they rape the economy before demanding million dollar bonuses & bail outs)). Where are all these new pot smokers going to come from? There are already 40 million smokers in a country of 300 million. That’s not taking into account the 75 million under the age of 18, or the 39 million over the age of 65. Plus since so many people are already against it, they’re not going to admit it. There will be a surge, but that will be more to people admitting to a legal action than actual new smokers.

“Crime will go through the roof.” Stoned people buy colored Christmas tortilla chips, eat Twinkies, and stare at Pepsi cans. The sheer amount of people who would no longer get arrested for possessing marijuana will lead to a sharp drop in crime in and of itself. Add in the people switching from alcohol (so less fighting, spousal abuse, child abuse, assault, sexual assaults, and murder) and all those wasted crime fighting resources towards actual serious crime and the truth is that crime will go DOWN by quite a bit.

There are many more myths, and this page includes several resources, including links to pages showing how these “conclusive studies” showing the harm weed causes are anything but.

I hope this at least gives you something to chew on when considering this debate topic. If you have any thoughts on the legalize marijuana debate, please feel free to comment – just keep the language clean and respectful, please.

Number of people who died from (per year avg):

Rabies: 1-2

Tipping over a vending machine: 2

Red Bull & Vodka: 0-5, depending who you ask

Peanut Butter/Peanut allergies: 7

Snake bite: 12

Struck by lightning: 26

Giving Birth: approximately 600

Aspirin & similar anti-inflammatory drugs: 7,600

Homicide: 23,000

Car accidents: 26,000

Marijuana Trimming in Las Vegas

Firearms: 29,000

Suicide: 30,600

Alcohol & alcohol poisoning: 85,000

Tobacco: 435,000

Medical malpractice: 195,000 a year (in the U.S. alone)

Heart Attack: 460,000 a year (U.S. alone)

Prescription drugs (overdoses, side effects, wrong prescriptions, etc): 783,936 (yes, that number’s right – I double checked several times to be sure)

Marijuana overdoes deaths: ZERO!